Five ways you can help 520 shelter pets find homes

Bev Greco speaks about animal adoption at the South Jersey Regional Animal Shelter on Tuesday, September 18. (Photo: Adam Monacelli/Staff Photographer)

VINELAND – Lines of those coming and going seem never-ending at the filled-to-capacity South Jersey Regional Animal Shelter, inundated with pits and kits.

“The overcrowding has been all summer,” Bev Greco, the shelter’s executive director told The Daily Journal on Tuesday. “Every time we turn around, we have kittens coming in the door.”

On Monday, the shelter took in 28 kittens pushing its occupancy up to 427 cats and 93 dogs, many of them pit bulls.

The shelter relies on a network of foster homes and rescue partners from Massachusetts to Delaware to help settle pets into homes. This poses the challenge of longer stays while pets wait for space to become available in other shelters where demand is higher and odds of adoption increase, she said.

Petco awarded the shelter a $40,000 grant to ready pets for transfers. Kittens, for example, must be healthy, weigh at least two pounds and had two rounds of vaccines before they are eligible, Greco said.

Hurricane Florence will likely impact adoptions as area shelters take in animals displaced from hard-hit areas.

“Our transfer partners will be filled up and unable to help us for a while until those animals move through,” Greco said.

Hudson poses for a picture at the South Jersey Regional Animal Shelter on Tuesday, September 18. He is currently up for adoption.

Hudson poses for a picture at the South Jersey Regional Animal Shelter on Tuesday, September 18. He is currently up for adoption. (Photo: Adam Monacelli/Staff Photograph)

How you can help:

Adopt: If you can make a long-term commitment, give a pet a home. There’s a special appeal for a bull dog aptly named Picasso due to his unique facial features. The 2-year-old’s been a guest of the shelter for 104 days.

Spay-neuter:  “This makes all the difference in the world,” Greco said. “It’s the one thing our community needs to embrace more.” The shelter offers low-cost clinics and supports trap, neuter and release as way to cut down on litters and ensure cats are vaccinated. The shelter is also encouraging a crackdown on illegal pit bull breeding.

Foster: Providing a temporary home for an animal frees space for the shelter to take in another. As of Tuesday, 38 dogs and 173 cats were in foster care.

Volunteer:  The shelter takes cats and dogs to PetSmart and other adoption events where they might catch the attention of potential adopters and needs help to do so. Saturdays are a prime time when extra help is needed.

Donate: Due to demand, the shelter needs dry cat and kitten food. Donations are also needed to cover  medical expenses for rescue pets. Send checks made out to the South Jersey Regional Animal Shelter, 1244 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland, 08360. You may also donate online at www.southjerseyregionalanimalshelter.org.

Deborah M. Marko; 856-563-5256; dmarko@gannettnj.com; Twitter: @dmarko_dj

 

(Photo: Adam Monacelli/Staff Photograph)

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Source: Five ways you can help 520 shelter pets find homes

Special help available for senior dogs, owners

The South Jersey Regional Animal Shelter in Vineland is proud to have been selected as a Grey Muzzle Organization grant recipient this year.

The Grey Muzzle Organization is a wonderful organization that funds programs run by shelters and rescues that benefit senior dogs. We have had this honor in the past, and our Grey Muzzle grants have helped to form and sustain our shelter’s Senior Society. This year’s grant is extra special because it allows us to expand our Senior Society to include community outreach and owner surrender prevention.

In addition to providing medical care for senior dogs who have been released to the shelter, were found as strays or are cruelty cases, we are now also able to offer assistance to members of our community who own senior dogs they want to keep but just need some help to be able to do so. We recognize that the best place for senior dogs is with the family who loves them, and now we have the ability to provide assistance to some families to keep them there!

We also have had situations where it’s not possible to support the dog staying home. We always strive to respect owners and their particular situation. The welfare of the animal is most important, but as a community-based program, working with and respecting owners is a part of our program as well. When these situations arise, we try to determine if it’s in the dog’s best welfare to be immediately brought to the shelter for care or if we have time to try to find a home or rescue for the dog so he can skip the often stressful shelter stay.

We are currently working with both situations:

  • Scooter’s family reached out for help and he was released to the shelter this weekend because he had developed a medical condition that needed medical care. He’s now receiving medication and soon will be looking for a new home.
  • We are also helping Mikey, a 15-year-old Corgi mix whose family is unable to care for him. They are keeping him at home until we find a family that can better meet his needs.

We also provide hospice care for senior dogs who have medical conditions that we cannot fix. We can give them lots of love and comfort and dignity as they finish out their time with us. We are currently providing a beautiful Labrador named Buddy with hospice care; he’s very loved in a foster home and receiving medication and special food to keep him feeling his best. We are seeking sponsors for Buddy’s prescription food, as we hope to be able to need it for months to come! This is a wonderful way to help us help our seniors.

And, of course, we continue to provide care for the many senior dogs that arrive as strays. We try to get our seniors into foster homes, where they are more comfortable. That’s the case with Amigo, who has been waiting for over 100 days to find a home! He’s a staff and volunteer favorite, and awesome just pours out of him like rays of sunshine! He’s perfect with other dogs and cats, and housebroken. He’s an outdoor enthusiast – loving trees and water and leaves and sunshine and dirt. If you need a devoted companion in your life, he’s the perfect AMIGO for you.

We also are caring for Jack, another favorite of staff and volunteers, who hasn’t found a forever or a foster home yet. Jack is a boxer/bulldog mix who is 8 years old and just about as lovely as they come.  He’s very well-trained, housebroken, neutered and just waiting to offer you his big paw as a sign of goodwill. He loves when volunteers snuggle in his kennel with him. He’s been a bit stiff, living in a kennel during the winter, but fortunately our Grey Muzzle Organization grant has allowed us to keep him comfortable with medication. Jack is a big boy; the only thing bigger than his paws are his heart. Jack would love to find a warm home to curl up in sooner rather than later. Come visit him at the shelter.

For more information about adoptable Senior Society dogs, sponsorship opportunities, fostering or hospice opportunities, or to seek help with a senior dog, please contact me at Rescuepartners@cumberlandcountyspca.org.

Source: Special help available for senior dogs, owners

Mike Trout to be face of pit bull spay and neuter campaign | NJ.com

Before going to Arizona for spring training, Millville-born superstar Mike Trout came home for a photo shoot with a pit bull named Gemma.

It’s part of a new campaign to raise awareness about spaying and neutering the pit bull population and alerting Cumberland County residents that they can get their pit bulls fixed for free while funds are available. NJ Aid for Animals and the Cumberland County SPCA are paying for the spaying and neutering.

“We want to give people a call to action and that’s what a billboard does,” said Kathy McGuire, president and founder of NJ Aid for Animals.

Her organization did Operation Knock Out in 2011, where billboards featuring boxer Bernard Hopkins went up in Camden — letting people know that their pit bulls can be spayed and neutered for free.

The campaign led to a 68 percent increase in spaying and neutering in the city, according to the organization’s website.

“We think people want to do the right thing,” McGuire said. “They just need a little nudge.”

She hopes to repeat that success in Cumberland County.

For both the Camden and Cumberland County campaigns, NJ Aid for Animals worked with the Gerald B. Shreiber Foundation. Shreiber is the founder of J&J Snack Foods Corp., which has Trout as a sponsor for Superpretzel.

“I think that it’s a great message to be sent out, especially for us here, by a local hero,” said Bev Greco, executive director of the Cumberland County SPCA. “I think it’s a really good message to kids and something adults will pay attention to when they see his face associated with it.”

The Cumberland County SPCA and NJ Aid for Animals are splitting the cost of the spaying and neutering of pit bulls. The procedure will be done at the Cumberland County SPCA facility.

“Because of the fact that there are so many pit bulls and they can be so hard to place, many of them end up being put down,” Greco said. “It’s really important in order to curtail the need for euthanasia that these animals be spayed and neutered.”

There is a large population of pit bulls in the county and — without a way to control the pet population — it will continue to grow.

“Everybody hates the fact that animals have to be put to sleep but they wouldn’t have to be put to sleep if people spayed and neutered them so we don’t have this population,” Greco said.

The billboards will be on display in Cumberland County throughout April. Even without the billboards, McGuire said, she’s already had 20 people call in the last three days about having their pit bulls fixed for free.

The funds used to pay for the spaying and neutering were raised by donations to the NJ Aid for Animals.

To donate to the organization, visit www.njafa.org. To spay or neuter a pit bull through the program, call 856-728-0911 or email info@njafa.org.

Gemma, the pit bull photographed with Trout, is also up for adoption, McGuire added.

Trout graduated from Millville Senior High School in 2009 and was drafted by the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and started playing with the team in 2011.

Over his three full seasons with the Angels, Trout has racked up numerous awards and accolades, including being named to three All-Star teams, the 2012 American League Rookie of the Year and the 2014 AL MVP.

Source: Mike Trout to be face of pit bull spay and neuter campaign | NJ.com

Quick Fix Grant

spayed-kittyjpgCumberland County SPCA & South Jersey Regional Animal Shelter Offers Free Sterilizations for Pet Cats

Vineland, NJ, July 15, 2013 —  Cumberland County SPCA, located at 1244 N Delsea Drive, is offering 2,300 free cat sterilizations for any pet cats living in the 08360 or 08361 zip code area, thanks to a grant from PetSmart Charities®. Residents living in Vineland can visit the SPCA facility during business hours to make an appointment for one of the free sterilizations. 

readallaboutit3“This is a really good offer and one that will end when the grant monies run out,” says Beverly Greco, Executive Director, Cumberland County SPCA. “We really want to see pet owners in Vineland take advantage of these free spay/neuter surgeries to help reduce the cat population in Vineland.”  

 CCSPCA & SJRAS is a 501(c)3 organization that relies on grant funding and donations to offer free to low-cost sterilization services for pet owners in the community. For more information, call 856-691-1500, visit www.CumberlandCountySPCA.org, or stop by during business hours.
   

CCSPCA SJRAS Logo
 
About CCSPCA & SJRAS
We are a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides free and low-cost spay/neuter services for dogs and cats in and around Cumberland County, NJ sterilizing more than 4,000 pets annually. Cumberland County SPCA relies solely on community support and grant funding to operate their clinic. The Cumberland County SPCA low-cost clinic has been in operation for more than 11 years. Low-cost services are offered to any pet owner, regardless of where they live.

 

 

Petsmart logo grantAbout PetSmart Charities®
Established in 1994, PetSmart Charities, Inc. is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that creates & supports programs that save the lives of homeless pets, raise awareness of companion animal welfare issues & promote healthy relationships between people and pets. The largest funder of animal-welfare efforts in North America, PetSmart Charities has provided more than $165 million in grants & programs benefiting animal-welfare organizations & has helped save the lives of more than 5 million pets through its in-store adoption program. To learn about how PetSmart Charities is working toward its vision of a lifelong, loving home for every pet, visit petsmartcharities.org or call 1-800-423-PETS (7387).